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New free service from Waikato DHB lets health workers keep up to date

All health workers in the Waikato now have free online access to the latest medical research thanks to a new service from Waikato District Health Board.

Access to a wide range of online journals, currently available to DHB staff, has now been extended to all health professionals in the Waikato, including GPs, aged care facility staff, and Hospice staff.

Library Manager, Angela Broring, explained: “Up to now, health workers in our district would either have to pay for subscriptions to the journals, travel to Waikato Hospital to read them or access a short abstract of the article on the internet. With this new service they can access many full articles in all the latest medical journals for free online.”

The online databases include:

  • Medline – the world’s largest collection of medical publications with access to millions of articles.
  • CINAHL, the equivalent database for nurses and allied heath professionals.
  • Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection – for mental health professionals.
  • Health Business Elite – for health care administrators and managers.

Dr Damian Tomic, Clinical Director of Primary and Integrated Care, who negotiated the online access, said: “Health workers can search for a topic and bring up all the latest research published in reputable journals. This is ideal for clinicians undertaking research or as a way to keep up to date with the latest evidence-based research and advances in healthcare. It is particularly useful for our many rural colleagues who can feel professionally isolated.”

To register for the service, health professionals should visit www.waikatodhb.health.nz/library They also get free membership to the Waikato DHB library including books, articles and help with research.

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